Confluence Charter Schools to welcome Carolyn McKinstry, community/civil rights leader
Confluence Charter Schools to welcome Carolyn McKinstry, community/civil rights leader
Posted on 03/12/2013
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You may not know her name, but if you know the history of the Civil Rights Movement, you will understand what she experienced.

 

Carolyn Maull McKinstry was at the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala. when it was bombed on September 15, 1963.

 

McKinstry will speak to seventh and eighth grade students of Confluence Charter Schools on March 14 at 1:00 p.m. at Confluence Preparatory Academy.* She will share her experiences of the 1960s and their relevance to today’s world.

 

Four young girls lost their lives in the bombing – Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson and Cynthia Wesley. Another girl, Sarah Collins, the sister of Addie Mae, survived the bombing but suffered serious injuries. McKinstry was friends with each of the girls.

 

McKinstry, a native of Birmingham, is an associate minister with a passion for community service. She is an active volunteer with many community activities and organizations, and has held several leadership roles within the organizations. She spends time speaking to young people, educators and institutions about her experiences.

 

In a recent interview on the Today Show on NBC, McKinstry talked about an upcoming documentary, “March to Justice.” She is featured in the film.

 

Her memoir, “While the World Watched,” details her life growing up in Birmingham, lessons she has learned and her involvement in the Civil Rights Movement.

 

*Due to limited seating, the event is not open to the public.